Sunday, 28 April 2013

Fuzzhugger Phantom Octave

 I do find these small boards less stressful to draw :) This one is small enough to fit in 1590A without any problems, but if you're feeling adventurous you can shave off one row from the right hand side. I left there a bit space so 100µ caps have more room to sit in nicely... Schematic has the onboard LED as 5mm red, but you could try out different colours to see how those affect the octaves.. I must add that this puppy is sounding pretty cool and it is priced reasonably, so you should consider getting yourself an original...

From Fuzzhugger(fx):
Equal parts mysterious and ghastly, the Phantom Octave is a shape-shifting octave fuzz monster!

No controls? They're not necessary--they're at your fingertips! The Phantom Octave is extremely interactive with your pickup selection, picking intensity, and your guitar's Tone control. Like its namesake, the octave will disappear with picking intensity and by rolling back your guitar's Tone control. Octave effect is strongest with low-output single coil pickups.

With the flip of your pickup selector and your picking technique, you'll find huge octave downs, glitchy ring mod-ish tones, and even be able to bang out some simple chords! Set the intensity of the effect by using your guitar's Tone control as a Blend. Roll your guitar's Tone control all the way back, and you've got a chord-friendly fuzz!

The Phantom Octave is a very strange pedal compared to most octave fuzzes...in some ways, it's more stable...in many ways, glitchier. It'll sound different with each set (and combination) of pickups. Some pickup selections will produce more exciting results than others. On most guitars, the Tone knob allows you to blend out the intensity of the octave and glitch. Easier to master and jam on (which is not to call this beast stable, but)--for example, you'll be able to get away with some bends and power chords! You'll quickly get used to the sensitivity of the pedal and what different playing techniques and settings will
produce.

Controls:
• Output: Controls the output level of the Phantom Octave!
• Interacts strongly with your pickup selection (and playing technique). A guitar with a three-way selector means three settings!
• Your Guitar's Tone knob will blend out effect intensity. When blended out, you get a nice smooth fuzz tone!

• Must be used with passive magnetic pickups (standard guitar and bass pickups), and be placed first/early in your effects chain.






Here's demo of Geiri's build:

80 comments:

  1. That looks like something I've seen before

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm just checking through old schematics, something about the diodes and LED rings a bell but can't remember what

      Delete
    2. That's pretty common way of creating octaves, so i wouldn't be surprised if it were really close to some older design. I just can't remember seeing those driven by LM386. But granted, it's not that far away from Gus' Oct Up Sick Box either.. I'm still liking his pricing. Might even get myself one if i hadn't Flying V and tons of other stuff on que... :)
      +m

      Delete
    3. Yes! I knew I wasn't going mad. Penny Pedals Fingerprint!

      Delete
    4. Haha! It is pretty close :) Basically a 3 knob version, but the topology is quite similar...
      +m

      Delete
    5. I saw this and immediately thought of the Fingerprint, too. :)

      Delete
  2. tag this one, sounds exactl like the demo

    ReplyDelete
  3. Aren't the two caps in parallel (100nf and 100uf) the same as a 100.1uf cap? If so, you can ditch the second 100nf, I imagine.
    Thanks for this one. I have everything to build this and it sounds like garbage in the best possible way?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Those are for power filtering. So it should work fine without them too..
      +m

      Delete
  4. Are there any other circuits besides this and the Fingerprint that use the diode-in-feedback-loop in conjunction with a 386?

    ReplyDelete
  5. Just built. Yeah, this little shit is great! Will get boxed as soon as I get my new 1590A's lot. Sometimes these little effects are amazing!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Ì want to install a diode like the blue one on the demo, that lits as you play. LM386 is a really unknown IC for me, so I'm no sure where could i take this led from.

    Any hint?

    P.S. No, my 5mm red led doesn't lit :P

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Try this: Instructables Blinking LED tutorial. There could be a more simple way, but I've used this in the past and it definitely works.

      Delete
    2. Thanks Rick, interesting gadget :) I think i'll be able to make something similar and fit it together with the effect inside a 1590A :)

      BR

      Delete
    3. For what you need you'd only need half of that circuit, ie. One resistor, one Led and one TIP31 so I'm sure it'd fit.

      Delete
    4. Yeah, I supposed so, as this gadget uses two circuits (one for each channel of the stereo).

      Tomorrow is bank holiday in Madrid too, but on friday will pay a visit to my local store to get some Tip31s.

      Thanks again!

      Delete
  7. Built it, gated fuzz and a hint of octave, not as strong as the original video.
    I had a blue LED, and took it out of circuit and it sounds pretty much the same without it...

    ReplyDelete
  8. ...and with the red LED, it is a bit more like the vids.
    Reminds me a LOT of the Shin-ei FY-2 but with tons less soldering!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hello all - I wondered if I could ask for a little help on this one...?
    Built (I think), as per the layout, I get a bassy fuzz, but nothing I'd call an octave down. If I pull the LED out, it makes no difference to the sound. If I reverse the polarity of the LED (anode to ground rail), I get a change in tonality and a glitchier decay, and the LED lights with playing (like the video - looks good!), but still no octave down. I've tried a range of different colours and sizes of LEDs (except for blue, which I don't have to hand). Both the 100nF caps on mine are polyboxes (I see they are shown differently on the diagram) - could that be significant?
    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When I get mine back, I'll flip the LED and try it. Someone's recording with it this week.

      Delete
  10. Anyone have a link to the schematic? I found the Penny Pedals Fingerprint schem on La Revolution Deux, and it appears VERY similar.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I'd love to see a schematic too. Looking at the Fingerprint you mention, D2 1N4148 and the LED are opposite polarity, back to back as a conventional clipping arrangement (I think - still quite new to this!). On the Phantom Octave Vero layout, they look to be the same way round....?

      Delete
    2. http://www.freestompboxes.org/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=22237&p=220767
      +m

      Delete
    3. Cool - thanks! That definitely shows both diodes in the same polarity...... Hmmmm....

      Delete
    4. Welll... If I'm not wrong, the led is a hb blue led, not a difused or hb red.

      I thought that there where inside some kind of gadget that made a blue led lit as you play, but taking a look at the guts, there's only one led: the one on the board.

      Will check this evening with a hb blue. Led is correctly placed accordin to the FSB circuit... but it doesn't assure us that is correct :P

      Delete
    5. Well, just done. In my opinion: Blue high bright led, positive to groun: works and sounds exactly the same than the demo.

      No way the led can be lit if not in this position, and this is the only one led that the original has in the FSB post.

      So I believe, after taking a look at the Fingertrip and swappin' the led that the schematics in FSB is mistaken at this point.

      BR

      Delete
    6. Great - many thanks for checking that out. I've put some blue LEDs on order - looking forward to some low octaves!
      Brad

      Delete
    7. Thanks Javi for the input. I updated the layout to match your corrections.
      +m

      Delete
  11. Hey guys, I'm pretty new to all of this stuff and I have a question about which components I should use.
    I looked at the picture, and I know the difference between resistors and capacitors, but I don't know what watts I should use, or which exact capacitor/resistor I should use. Is there some kind of key somewhere that would help me identify what I should use?
    Thanks for any help!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You should probably read the component introduction and sourcing guide i wrote:
      http://tagboardeffects.blogspot.fi/p/components.html
      +m

      Delete
  12. Replies
    1. The output is located on lug 2 of Level pot.

      Delete
  13. Hi!
    pedal does not work at all, shows no signs that it might be?

    ReplyDelete
  14. I'm getting a motor boat sound is it the red LED or the 2 1meg resistors tied together in place of a 2.2m?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Motor boat noise usually means that you haven't grounded something that should be grounded, so check ground connections.
      Thanks
      Dave

      Delete
    2. there is no sound, checked the voltage, all right, but there is no sound

      Delete
  15. It was one leg of the 100n cap in the wrong place. It's all good now. Thank you

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. checked, all right, but does not work.
      what cap exactly?

      Delete
    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  16. Does the mm size of the LED matter? In other words, can I use a 3mm Blue LED?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Doesn't matter. The forward voltage drop is the important factor, not dimensions.

      Delete
    2. Just built this. Sounds like a cool splatty fuzz. However, there is no octave of any kind going on. I'll try a red LED and see what happens.

      Delete
    3. To get the octave down, you have to play with the guitar and tone volume pots of your guitar.

      On my les paul (with lin tone pots, log volume ones and SD APH-1 pickups)), with tone rolled full CCW and volume at 9-10= nice soft fuzz. Volume at 8 and tone a 4: very present octave down. The upper the tone, the less the octave and the wilder and gated the fuzz.

      BR

      Delete
    4. Yep, got some octave stuff happening with a Les Paul. I was using a Telecaster before.

      Delete
  17. I'm not building these any more, but I'd be happy to by special-order if anyone wants one ($75). I guess you could call it a stripped-down Fingerprint...more accurately, a variation on Tim Escobedo's Rambler. :)

    ReplyDelete
  18. This is my first vero build. I've done some kits with PCB and didn't have a problem. I just build this and I'm getting mostly nothing when it's on. Just a little cleanish guitar sound but it's very quite. Below are some images. Any help you guys can give would be awesome! Thanks!

    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/2200156/fuzzhugger-phantom-octave/Photo%20Jun%2016%2C%2012%2024%2004%20AM.jpg

    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/2200156/fuzzhugger-phantom-octave/Photo%20Jun%2016%2C%2012%2025%2015%20AM.jpg

    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/2200156/fuzzhugger-phantom-octave/Photo%20Jun%2016%2C%2012%2024%2027%20AM.jpg

    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/2200156/fuzzhugger-phantom-octave/Photo%20Jun%2016%2C%2012%2024%2046%20AM.jpg

    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/2200156/fuzzhugger-phantom-octave/Photo%20Jun%2016%2C%2012%2026%2012%20AM.jpg

    ReplyDelete
  19. Hi Steve,
    I can't see properly but I think you've connected the negative leg of the led in the wrong row.
    They should be soldered in the same rows of D2 with the positive leg of the led on the ground row.

    ReplyDelete
  20. ...also, I can't see any Ground wire soldered to the last row.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Alex, You were totally right on both errors. I fixed them and rocked the pedal for about an hour. It sounds awesome! Thanks so much for your help!

      Delete
  21. Anyone know what it would take to add a gain control to this pedal?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Usual way to have gain control on 386 chips is to place 1K (maybe even 2K if you're feeling adventurous) pot between pins 1 and 8. So you would take wires to two top rows on the right hand side. If it does nothing at first, remoce the 100µ cap between those rows.
      That should do it.
      +m

      Delete
  22. Just getting around to building this one. I don't have any blue LEDs. I do however have a waterclear blue LED. Should I expect the same result from the waterclear?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The original is a 5mm clear blue led, so, no problem at all :)

      BR

      Delete
    2. Ok, built this pedal last night. I'm having an issue with it however... quick staccato notes sound fine but if I try to sustain a note, it quickly fades in a 'something is wrong' sort of way. The only difference between my build and the schem is that I had to use a standard green mylar for the red 100nf cap and I used a 5% 2.2M resistor. The LED appears to be working fine as it lights up and fades with playing. Any ideas where to start? I socketed the IC so I can try switching that out if need be. Also, if I don't have my guitar output volume dimed, I get very limited results (both a mustang w/ humbuckers and a strat w/ singles).

      Delete
  23. Here is a video of the one I build: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jp7a_NkZJug

    ReplyDelete
  24. I'd like to add a knob to control the amount of octave. Does any know if this is possible and how I might do this.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I built this a couple of times. Since the decay was so rough I bought a few LM386N3s to try in lieu of the cheap N series I had been using. Not only was the decay a LOT smoother, but the octave was way stronger. It makes the pedal!

    Incidentally, the 100n cap in parallel with the 100uf electrolytic is superfluous. Save it for every other effect in the universe that needs one!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This same thing happened with my parallel universe build. I bought a ton of 386 chips whenever I'd see them cheap.. the radioshack one of all things worked the best. So I'd recommend everyone try a few. Radioshack sells 386 still, I may go buy a few and try them too

      Delete
  26. This was the 5th pedal I ever built. When I built it I thought an LED was an LED - only difference being the color. I had no idea what forward voltage drop was (or much else for that matter). I only had red then, so I stuck a red one in it and never thought much about it.

    The sound was awful. Sort of splatty, quick decaying of notes, only worked when my volume pot was at 10 on my guitar. I hated the pedal.

    This morning I resurrected it from the leper colony and swapped the red LED for a blue one as the layout calls for. HOLY CRAP!!! What a peach. I have been playing it for the last hour with a big stupid smile on my face. I love this pedal now.

    ReplyDelete
  27. I get no octave with blue or red led. What could be wrong?

    ReplyDelete
  28. Wow! I just built this one and it sounds great! Thanks for all the great projects!

    ReplyDelete
  29. Is D3 used as the LED as well (run it to the bezel?) or would this require a separate LED for that?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. d3 is part of the clipping in the effect. which means you will need to run a separate LED to a bezel and switch to let you know the effect is on.

      Delete
  30. THANKS! I built it, boxed it, and the damned thing actually works! (First pedal build. Put this in a 1590A. It's not so pretty inside.)

    ReplyDelete
  31. "....quick staccato notes sound fine but if I try to sustain a note, it quickly fades in a 'something is wrong' sort of way..." I get the same result. I've also lost a couple of diodes a couple of times...burnt out. It keeps packing up and comes back again. How sensitive is the build to the type of cap is this in terms of % and material they are made from?

    ReplyDelete
  32. Succesfully built. Sounds awful with my high output p90s and I love it. Exactly what I was hoping for.

    ReplyDelete
  33. By adding a toggle switch to lift D3, would that turn off and on the octave?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. See my very recent post. Lift D1 .. I did it by accident and it sounds awesome

      Delete
    2. See my very recent post. Lift D1 .. I did it by accident and it sounds awesome

      Delete
  34. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  35. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Successfully built this one this afternoon!Fun pedal!Had a blast dialing different tones with the guitar knobs and pickups!

    ReplyDelete
  37. Hi guys, thanks for sharing your experience and the support.
    This is my first pedal built from scratches, made it work at the second time and successfully put into an enclosure. However, I feel that the octave effect is present only when tone put is fully open, otherwise the sound becomes gated. I'm playing through a japanese jaguar, didn't try with humbuckers. Do you guys have any ideas for that?

    ReplyDelete
  38. Such a fun pedal! If you dig glitched-out, mono synth-like sound, build this. One of my friends commented that it had an almost Royal Blood sound. In this video demo, I illustrate a few different ways in which to use the pedal: typical lead runs, modulation switching with pickup selector (I'm on a Strat), and drones (w/delay in reverse).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YlQlFGAUuhI&index=7&list=PLQe4mkX6q4Yu8-sa39STJz6eaIClo5Lzs

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cool! Nice variety of uses. It's a big sound for such an easy build.

      Delete
  39. So I built this, and accidentally put the positive leg of D1 up one row.. and it's a super smooth warm fuzz with no glitches. So I put in a spdt switch that basically disconnects D1 or has it wired to where it's supposed to be.. so now it'll be a super smooth fuzz or octave glitch at the flip of a switch. The lifted diode does increase the output a little. I tried about 30 of the 386 and found the best is a JRC I got fromy tayda. Try the mod!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Incidentally, I've tried numerous LEDs of various sizes and colors. The 5mm UV is the best by far, and some asymmetrical trio of GE diodes is also amazing. I'm probably going to put 6 different ones on a rotary for fun. Mileage

      Delete