Saturday, 26 July 2014

Madbean Bloviator

Madbean simplification of Bajaman's "Sonic Stump". As you can see, you'll need at least 1590B to box this. If you want the same circuit in a smaller A-box, you should check out Madbean's PCBs.


14 comments:

  1. They didn't say the parts were proprietary, they said the "process" was proprietary, which it is.

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    1. No. Not the *part* as a component, but *part* as in section of the design that has four opamp channels stacked as a dual filter. I'm having some trouble seeing how the dual filter can be proprietary. If anyone has a patent to show, i'd be interested to see it. They could have meant the manufacturing process though.
      Who doesn't love semantics in the morning.
      +m

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    2. They are talking about the signal processing process, i.e., what does this pedal do?That part is proprietary.

      Unless the Sonic Stomp is different from the other Sonic Maxamisers, it's not just a stacked filter. The way the Sonic Maximizer works, is it splits the signal into three bands, and puts slight delays on the Mid and Bass bands. The Sonic Maximizer plays the highs as they come in, slightly delays the mids, and plays the lows last.

      That's the proprietary process they are referring too.

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    3. Ok. This is actually pretty interesting.
      http://www.njr.com/semicon/PDF/NJM2150_E.pdf

      So it seems a lot more like the component itself and its use is proprietary. The discrete version is functioning in the same manner, but as it still is only stacked filters... No delay circuitry in either method.
      +m

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  2. Also, when BBE refer to the effect, they call it the "BBE Process"

    Here you are: US Patent 5736897

    http://www.google.com/patents/US5736897

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    1. More interesting all the time.
      +m

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    2. Maybe i'll just remove all the brand name citations... :) Thanks anomalous for sharing the info.
      +m

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  3. The BBE Sonic Stomp may be using their proprietary IC, but apparently it's not using the patented part which is the variable response based on signal level. Without this, it's simply a run-of-the-mill state variable filter with all outputs summed to create an all-pass filter. This circuit is nearly identical to Craig Anderton's Super Tone Control, but with the Frequency and Q controls set by fixed resistors and with variable resistors between the outputs of the low pass and high pass filters and the summing amp input.

    This design has approximately 360 degrees of phase shift between 20Hz and 20kHz which translates into approximately 2.5mS of delay at 20Hz. While other companies go to great lengths to design tone controls without phase shift, to avoid transient "smearing", BBE is marketing phase shift as a feature.

    For more information, you can google all-pass and state variable filters.

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    1. If we had a like button on these comments, you would definitely get one...
      +m

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    2. I made this pedal on pcb last year adding a mid knob, I'm thinking about modding it to be parametric thanks to your comment.
      Now I only need some free time :D
      Cheers!

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    3. Wow. Frequency, Q and Mids on this would be absolutely great.

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  4. and a beautiful effect it is !

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