Saturday, 5 April 2014

Barber Gain Changer

Another versatile overdrive here from Dave Barber, and as usual at a very fair price.  If you want to fine tune the mids and bass content to suit your own style or gear, consider socketing the 7K5 resistor on the right for mids, and the 22K resistor at the top for bass.

Info about the original:

Measuring only 2.3” wide, the NEW Barber Gain-Changer harnesses a vast spectrum of EQ and gain. Flick the toggle one way and you have sweet very low-gain overdrive, flick it the other way and you get wildly charged harmonic content of our much praised unLimiTeD distortion. Pop over to the other toggle-switch and you can volley between the flat sweet-EQ of the LTD SR , the vintage snarling-fat-EQ of our classic LTD v2 or a new voice that combines flat EQ with a little added fatness. Combine all these different options together and you have a super-versatile harmonic beast. Our goal was to shrink the size of our pedals and retain all the ultra-high quality electronics and build quality that we are world famous for. In the end, it’s almost impossible to miss the target if you are shopping for a new overdrive for your rig, “it’s like shooting fish in a barrel Jethro.”

The Gain-Changer has real honest solder lugs for jacks, True-bypass footswitch, toggles and pots. There are no worries about PCB mounted thru-panel parts that can’t be serviced on the road, or that lead to high cost repairs. Nothing but the best tried and true hand-built methods adorn the interior of the Barber Electronics Gain-Changer. The Gain-Changer has a generous 2 1/2” of clearance between the front edge of the footswitch and the back edge of the knobs, no more worries about changing your settings with each click of your footswitch. Buy a hand-built Barber Gain-Changer, and enter a world of immense overdrive possibilities.







15 comments:

  1. Built this one this afternoon, it´s working great but reverse gain 1 and gain 3. Everything Barber does sounds great and so does this one. Thanks a lot for the layout

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    1. Can't believe I got the gain lug numbering wrong!! I thought I knew what I was talking about with pots now! :o) Anyway that's excellent, thanks for verifying Bastian

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    2. Hi Ivlark. This is the second layout I did (noisy cricket mk II was my first) built, and it is working great, Thank you very much for your great work, it's fantastic ! (even if i did swap gain lug 1 and 3 after testing ;) ). Good job !

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    3. Reboxed it last month, really love Barber effects look and feel. Take this as a tribute : https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=538729569592587&l=c541d12d07
      I managed to put a battery in the box, really great layout and great sounding effect.

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    4. Nice job, thanks for sharing the pic

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  2. Haha - you´re the best! I used to wait for verified layouts before building. But with you, i know they always work when posting a new layout! Thanks again!

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  3. Hi there, where would I find schematic for this please? Cheers Steve

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  4. I'm learning as I go here.. d1 d2 d3 and d4 would appear to be a diode rectifier with a cap in the center.. whats going on here and is there another term for this layout ?

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    1. They're two series anti-parallel diodes in the feedback loop of the opamp, so simply for clipping and distorting the signal. You'll see those a lot in these layouts in both opamp and transistor circuits. 4 diodes like this clips less than just having a single pair of anti parallel diodes. Both of the above give you symmetrical clipping and so both halves of the waveform are clipped the same, but sometimes you'll see just one diode in one direction and two in the other which give you asymmetrical clipping where one side of the wave form clips more than the other. All variations with subtle differences.

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    2. Thanks, making more sense.. I've drawn the circuit out further and compared it to others and realized that it was partially the way i was drawing it that was confusing me.. ;)

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  5. I get quite the volume jump when I switch the gain switch. Is this normal?

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  6. In the original schematic there is a D5. I can't find it in your Layout. Why is that?

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    1. I haven't got the schematic in front of me but it will almost certainly be a parallel reverse polarity protection diode, which I always omit because I think they're stupid.

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