Saturday, 18 January 2014

Lotus Pedals Snowjob

I think we've seen this somewhere before.  Many times.
Info from the manufacturer about their original:

SNOWJOB, a dual mode underdrive, what the hell is an underdrive you ask, hold on, we will explain.  An underdrive is similar in function to an overdrive, except instead of driving the amp it drives from the guitar, adding harmonic content to fill the space between the notes.  The SNOWJOB is a dual mode underdrive, with the toggle to the left (white snow mode) the pedal is extremely transparent, almost acting like a boost, but full and rich with headroom to spare.  With the toggle to the right (yellow snow mode) the pedal is a bit more aggressive, adding musical harmonic clipping to the spaces between the notes, like a tube amp on the brink of destruction, right in that sweet spot.






51 comments:

  1. Where, oh where, have I seen this circuit before? Hmmm....

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    1. Not sure, but i think it has some similar features to some of Lovepedal's original work :PPPP
      +m

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  2. Well since I love all the Electra Distortion based circuits and I seem to have a lot less time for building for some reason I thought I better tackle this one seeing as I've been absent for a while. It's safe to say this is correct. I actually built two side by side on a board with one feeding the other and I only used the diode switch on the first side. Sounds like an Electra Distortion, which is to say it sounds pretty damn good, two together give it a slightly fuzzy, distortionish sound, especially with the clipping switch on, lovely stuff.

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  3. Ok, for the less electronically erudite, where have we seen this before, pray tell?

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    1. It's based on the circuit for the Electra Distortion which is the basis for several Lovepedal pedals including the COT50, Les Lius and Woodrow. It's kind of a running joke that Lovepedal seems to release so many pedals that are essentially the same but with a few tweaks.

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    2. I see! I was aware of the near endless list of Electra derived pedals. I wouldn't recognize one from sight though. How do you recognize one visually? What are the giveaways?

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    3. Single transistor generic amplifer stage followed by (usually switchable) anti-parallel diodes to ground at the output. The way the transistor biases can sometimes be slightly different, but usually the only changes are the input and output cap values.

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    4. If you look at the scheme for the Electra it should make it easier to recognise:
      http://i457.photobucket.com/albums/qq293/wood4630/electra_sch.jpg
      The only circuit difference with this one is the diodes are switchable and he included a bypass cap to ground at the emitter.

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    5. "harmonic content to fill the space between the notes".... but all I hear is my laptop fan between the notes, maybe i didn't ground it properly?! :P

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  4. I built this one last night and it's actually pretty darn good for being so simple.

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  5. "An underdrive is similar in function to an overdrive, except instead of driving the amp it drives from the guitar, adding harmonic content to fill the space between the notes."

    Dafuq did I just read?

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    1. That made me spit out the gulp of water I just took....Dafuq

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  6. Want to try this over the weekend, just want to clarify the spst is a 2 lug on off switch?

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    1. Yes. You may find it easier to find and cheaper to use a SPDT switch with 3 lugs, but it's no problem using that one instead, just use the middle and one of either the other lugs.

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    2. Cheers, have some 2 lug switches in my bits box is why i wanted to check

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    3. TNKS for the layout! This thing sounds sweet an simple. Stacks really well with the sweet honey!

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  7. Right noob question time :)

    Seems I don't have any 120n caps, 100n and 150n are my two closest. I would lean to using the 150n as I tend to play rather down tuned (Down to B in fact), and if my understanding of the vero is correctly, this is the input cap, and the higher the value, the more bottom end it lets through to ground. Is this correct?

    Also what would you suggest as a replacement for this?

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    1. I just built this for my bass with a few modifications. The 120nF cap is the input, and for me was way to bright, so I changed it to a 1uF. Play with it and see what you like. i even went so far as to change the diodes, and the transistor to make it a little warmer, and to my liking. Really great pedal, it's made a home on my board for sure.

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    2. Cheers for that, I'll socket and play with it

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    3. It's probably worth upping the 47n output cap as well as it does seem to choke the bass a little, I used 150n for the input cap as well so you won't have any problems with that.

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    4. good call Madferret, I was thinking about now going back and socketing the output cap. I was just too excited to play with it when I built it that I just forgot. Now its going to be a bitch to go back and change it, but definitely love this one.

      Great to play with, and mod to make your own.

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  8. Cheers madferret will socket both and see, thinking of doing the same with the clipping section and seeing what difference that makes too

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  9. Kind off a noobie question, but how would you wire up a 3 lug SPDT ON-ON switch?
    Where do SW1 and SW2 go?
    Great blog by the way!

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    1. If you're using a 3 lug SPDT switch there's just going to be one lug you won't use. Wire one of the SW wires (doesn't matter which) to one of the outside lugs and the other wire to the middle lug, then pretend the other outside lug doesn't exist or stop pretending and just chop it off ^_^

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  10. Just built this one last night. I didn't have any 120 nF caps so I tried a 100, and it was way too bright, so I skipped the 150 and went straight to a 200 nF and WOW! This little thing packs a huge punch. Really fast build, AMAZING tone. Thanks lvlark! ^_^

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  11. Hey guys, I have a quick question for ya. I'm extremely new to all of this and was wondering where the LED fit into this build. And if we need any other parts for the LED. Thanks guys!

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    1. Just choose the LED colour of your choice, and you'll need to go 9V > 2K2 resistor (or to taste based on how bright you want it) > LED anode > LED cathode > stomp switch (as shown in the offboard wiring layout in the menu).

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  12. I'm a beginner, so i want to ask you a stupid question. Where can i find on this scheme input and output?

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    1. If you can't see the input and output connections on the board then it is always mentioned in the notes. In this case input to Drive 3 and Volume 2 to output.

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  13. I haven't carefully studied the note ) Thank You!

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  14. So I decided I still wasn't really satisfied with the tone of this one, so I switched the 2N5088 for a 2N3904, and it sounds WAY better in my opinion. It beefed it up a lot so I was actually able to get the tone I wanted with a 47nF cap on the input. It gives a lot better breakup on the "yellow" channel and a lot more punch on the "white" channel. Just in case anyone is playing with it :)

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  15. Hey guys, I know that the volume one goes to the ground, but does that refer to the ground on the board? or one of the grounds on the input/output? Thanks!

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    1. Doesn't matter. I usually run it to the ground on the ground on the input or output lug, which ever is closer.

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  16. I'm getting a HUGE volume drop when I bring the clipping diodes into the circuit! What's wrong with it? I bread boarded it, and made sure nothing is touching that's not supposed to.

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    1. It disappeared, strange... could it be that I didn't push my breadboard leads all the way down when connecting the diodes?

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  17. I'm new to this - anyone have a list of parts from mouser or alliedelec?

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  18. I'm new to this - anyone have a list of parts from mouser or alliedelec?

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  19. I'm only getting gain when I turn the gain up almost all the way on the second channel, and almost no gain at all on the first channel. Any ideas on how to fix this?

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    1. Post your voltages, that will give us a good idea whether there is a problem somewhere

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  20. Hi ! This my first build here and I've got the same problem as Stevie Mangum. Almost no gain and on the second channel with the gain all the way up, a little gain but it sounds like the battery is dying. Voltages : (battery is fresh 9.58v) E = 8.38v / B= 0.71v / C = 0.13v
    Thanks :-)

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  21. Hi !! I have a problem! built the pedal and it works !! but with the transformer invested .... "ground is 9v" and "9 v is ground" so is correct working ???

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    1. If you reversed the polarity it wouldn't work properly, if at all. Check the voltages with a multimeter with the red positive probe at the 9V row and the black negative probe at the ground row. It should obviously read 9V, but if you are getting a -9V reading then you do have the wires reversed.

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    2. thanks ivlark !! change the transistor (BC557) by a BC547 is working perfect !! thank you very much !! Greetings !!!!!

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  22. Just built this guy and I must say, didn't like it very much...

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  23. Rafael - I did too and I definitely got something wrong. The diodes and switch have no impact at all and it sounds like the worst fuzz I have ever used. So I rebuilt it entirely because it was bugging me that such a simple circuit wasn't working. Same thing - switch and diodes do nothing. I removed both with no sound effect.

    So I am lost...

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    1. hey michael. you've got something wrong with your build. first off this effect will never be a fuzz, it can be a mild distortion at best. this is based on the old electra distortion, it just has a switch to remove the diodes from the circuit. without the diodes you'll have a clean loud, and i mean LOUD boost, but with the diodes in the circuit you'll get an OD to low gain distortion. if the diode switch isn't working you should debug it to figure out what's wrong and get it working right.

      post in the debugging section of the forum with pictures of the board (top and bottom), the wiring, and a description of what's wrong and i'm sure someone will try to help.

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  24. Sorry guys stupid question. What stomp switch do I use and where does it go?

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  25. "drives the guitar" "adds harmonic content to the space in between the notes" That's some marketing pseudoscience, huh? Utilizing the revolutionary guitar driving™ technology this pedal staves off childhood autism and leaves your guitar whiter and brighter.

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